Connecting...

4 Job Hunting Mistakes You're Probably Making

By Kinexus on 16 August 2016

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmjgvmdevmtkvmdavnjg0lzqtsm9iluh1bnrpbmcttwlzdgfrzxmtww914oczcmutuhjvymfibhkttwfraw5nlwuxndcxmzm0nzywodm5lmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtawmhg1mdajil1d

Searching for a new role can be an exciting, daunting and complicated easy-task. Your first instinct may be to take action. To start getting yourself out there, but as with most things, prior preparation prevents poor performance.

Often those who run head-on into application mode shoot themselves in the foot by not considering these 4 job hunting mistakes many people make.

I suggest you STOP and rethink your job seeking activity immediately if you are doing any of these 4 things:

1. Flicking your CV to multiple ads, companies or recruiters.
The spray and pray method is only guaranteed to cause confusion and embarrassment. Yes, you may get a call about a role that interests you. But, if your CV is all over town and industry, people will notice, and question your commitment to the job you’re applying for. Also, don’t give carte blanche to friends and recruiters to do the same.

The Fix: Create a hit list of companies and jobs you like, then tailor an engagement plan and CV for each. Don’t waste your time, invest it in the right places and it will pay off.

2. You have no idea what your priorities are.
How embarrassing would it be to knock back a job offer because the advertised salary wasn’t enough or the commute was way too far? Seriously; if you have not established what your minimum and maximums are before speaking to a company, you are asking for trouble.

The Fix: Create a list of exactly what you will and won’t compromise on. If the job doesn’t tick all the boxes, don’t waste your (or the companies) time applying

3. Not working with your current employer to address why you want to leave.
You’ll be surprised what a constructive discussion with your boss may produce. It might even result in them offering you a great reason to stay. All without the time and effort of having to look for another role. This approach also has the added benefit of avoiding an awkward counter offer situation.

The Fix: Have an open conversation with your boss before resigning. If you can’t reach a solution, you can leave knowing you have done the best thing for yourself and your employer.

4. Your Social Media (SM) profiles are out of date or down right awkward.
One of the first places potential future managers and co-workers go when considering you for a role is your Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. You would be surprised by the assumptions and information someone can form on you after a simple Google search. Just think about it for a second and ask yourself, ‘is your social media profile helping or harming your chances’?

The Fix: Google yourself and review every social media platform you have (even those old ones you don’t use anymore). Make private the appropriate ones, delete the inappropriate ones and tidy up anything public. Here are some more tips on tidying up your online profiles.

Do yourself a favour and take care of some of the basics before putting brand “You” out into the market.

Defence Sector Blog

Sign up to get a fortnightly dose of industry updates sent straight to your inbox.


From workforce strategy to sector overviews and interviews with interesting people, we aim to advise and summarise so we can all be better and more informed in what we do.

SIGN UP NOW

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdcvmjmvmdevmzavmjcvndkxl0rlzmvuy2ugu2vjdg9yiejsb2cgkdeplmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtawmhg1mdajil1d