Connecting...

5 Things Not to Do in Your Last Week at a Job

By Kinexus on 16 August 2016

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmjgvmdevmzkvmtmvmzg3lzutvghpbmdzlu5vdc10by1eby1pbi1zb3vyluxhc3qtv2vlay1hdc1hlupvyi1lmtq3mtmzndy5nju4ni5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijewmdb4ntawiyjdxq

When you’re finishing up with one employer and getting ready to start your next adventure it’s easy to forget you still work for your current employer and they are paying you to do a job.

Don’t fall into the trap of making these 5 mistakes in your last week and leaving a sour taste in everyone’s mouth.

1. Take or Make Copies of Confidential Information

This should be common sense but it’s a mistake people make all the time. Remember you don’t have a right to any confidential information of your employer and will have post-employment obligations to maintain the confidentiality of certain information. Even if you wrote it or created it you should not take or make copies of any confidential information or IP.

2. Delete all your emails

Whilst you might think you’re just tidying up – your employer will read it as being shady. Past emails will help whoever is doing your job go back and find correspondence. If you’re concerned about someone seeing your personal emails, go through and find these and delete them but don’t do a mass delete.

3. Bludge

When you’re on your last days it’s hard to maintain focus and be productive. Don’t fall into the trap of bludging your last days away surfing the internet. If you’ve done everything you need  to hand things over, set yourself some small goals to help your replacement or a colleague get ahead with something. If you really have nothing to do, speak to your manager, it might be best for you to finish up a few days earlier rather than just hanging around.

4. Discuss Your New Opportunity…Continuously

Changing jobs is one of the biggest changes we can make in life. Whilst it will be exciting for you, those around you may not feel the same. Keep in mind you leaving is likely going to increase your colleague’s workload and mean they have to work with someone new they don’t know so don’t be surprised if they don’t share your enthusiasm. Of course, if people ask questions you should answer them but don’t discuss your new role continuously.

5. Distract Those Around You

You may be leaving but everyone else still has a job to do. Bugging people with idle chitchat may fill in your day but it will frustrate those around you. Be respectful of their time and let them get on with their job.

Keep in mind, you’ll be remembered by how you finished the race, not how you started so make sure you wrap things up with class.

Defence Sector Blog

Sign up to get a fortnightly dose of industry updates sent straight to your inbox.


From workforce strategy to sector overviews and interviews with interesting people, we aim to advise and summarise so we can all be better and more informed in what we do.

SIGN UP NOW

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdcvmjmvmdevmzavmjcvndkxl0rlzmvuy2ugu2vjdg9yiejsb2cgkdeplmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtawmhg1mdajil1d